Professor Brett Hayes

Professor Brett Hayes

Professor Brett Hayes

Professor

PhD, 1991, UNSW

Contact details

Phone: (02) 9385 3713
Email: Professor Brett Hayes
Fax: (02) 9385 3641

Office: Mathews, Room 713

Research Summary

Research Areas: My research focuses on the processes involved in “high-level” cognition; i.e. how people think, reason, categorize and make decisions.  In particular my research focuses on: a) categorisation and inductive reasoning in adults, b) memory development and c) relations between reasoning and memory.  My work in these areas involves both experimental investigation and the application of computational models.  I also have a long-standing interest in the development of children's eyewitness memory and the forensic applications of such research. 

Current Research Projects:

Project: The Early Development of Reasoning.

Project: In Two Minds or Just One? Comparing Intuitive and Analytical Thinking

Project: How Do People Learn and Reason From Experience? Understanding Inductive Reasoning
Project: Considering Alternatives in Judgement and Decision-Making
Project: Inductive Reasoning in Generalization of Conditioned Fear

Click here to view the profile on UNSW Research Gateway.

Teaching

Courses:

PSYC2061: Developmental and Social Psychology

PSYC3341: Developmental Psychology

PSYC4063: Psychology 4B

PSYC3221: Cognitive Science

Publications

Recent publications:

Xie, B., Newell, B., McDonald, R., Hayes, B., & Brewer, M. B. (in press) Predicting climate change risk perception and willingness to act. Journal of Environmental Psychology.

Hayes, B. K., Navarro, D. J., Stephens, R. G., Ransom, K., Dilevski, N. (2019). The diversity effect in inductive reasoning depends on sampling assumptions. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review. https://doi.org/10.3758/s13423-018-1562-2

 

Lee, J. C., Lovibond, P. F., Hayes, B. K., & Navarro, D. (2019). Negative Evidence and Inductive Reasoning in Generalization of Associative Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 148(2), 289-303.

Stephens, R. G., & Dunn, J. C., & Hayes, B. K. (2019) Belief bias is response bias: Evidence from a two-step signal detection model. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition, 45(2), 320-332.

Stephens, R. G., Matzke, D., & Hayes, B. K. (2018). Disappearing dissociations in Experimental Psychology: Using state-trace analysis to test for multiple processes. Journal of Mathematical Psychology, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmp.2018.11.003

Lee, J. C., Hayes, B. K., & Lovibond, P. F. (2018). Peak shift and rules in human generalization. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition, 44 (12), 1955-1970.

Hayes, B. K. Stephens, R. G., Ngo, J., Dunn, J. C., (2018). The dimensionality of reasoning: Evidence for a single process account of inductive and deductive inference. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition. 44, (9), 1333-1351.

Stephens, R. G., Dunn, J. C., & Hayes, B. K. (2018). Are there two processes in reasoning? The dimensionality of inductive and deductive inferences. Psychological Review, 125(2), 218-244.

Kary, A., Newell, B. R., & Hayes, B K. (2018).What makes for compelling science? Evidential diversity in the evaluation of scientific arguments. Global Environmental Change, 49, 186-196.

Hayes, B. K., Ramanan, S., & Irish, M. (2018). “Truth be told” – Semantic memory as the scaffold for veridical communication. Behavioral & Brain Sciences, 41, 27-28. doi:10.1017/S0140525X17000012.

Nicholson, S. P., Carman, C. J., Coe, C. M., Feeney, A., Fehér, B., Hayes, B. K.,Kam, C., Karp, J. A., Vaczi, G. & Heit, E. (2018). The nature of party categories: Party differentiation and party system coherence, Advances in Political Psychology, 39, Suppl. 1. 10.1111/pops.12486

Liew, J., Grisham, J., & Hayes, B. K. (2018). Inductive and deductive reasoning in obsessive-compulsive disorder. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry. 59, 79-86

Hayes, B. K., Ngo, J., Newell, B. R., & Hawkins, G. E. (2018) Causal explanation improves judgment under uncertainty, but rarely in a Bayesian way. Memory and Cognition, 46, 112-131.

Hayes, B. K.The category use effect in clinical diagnosis (2018). Clinical Psychological Science, 6, 216-227.

Hayes, B. K., & Heit, E. (2018). Inductive Reasoning 2.0. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science, 9 (3), 1-13, e1459, https://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1459.

Papadopoulos, C. & Hayes, B. K (2017). What matters when judging intentionality – moral content or normative status? Testing the Rational Scientist model of the side-effect effect. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review (https://doi.org/10.3758/s13423-017-1312-x)

Kary, A., Hawkins, G. E., Hayes, B. K., & Newell B. R. (2017). A Bayesian latent mixture model approach to assessing performance in stock-flow reasoning. Judgment and Decision-Making, 12, 430-444.

Hayes, B. K., Dunn, J. C., Joubert, A., & Taylor, R. (2017). Comparing single- and dual-process models of memory development. Developmental Science. 20 (6), e12469, DOI: 10.1111/desc.12469

Hayes, B. K., Hawkins, G. E., & Newell, B. R. (2016). Consider the alternative: The effects of causal knowledge on representing and using alternative hypotheses in judgments under uncertainty. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory & Cognition. 42, 723-739.

Hawkins, G. E., Hayes, B. K., & Heit, E. (2016). A dynamic model of reasoning and memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 145, 155-180.

Hawkins, G. E., Hayes, B. K., Donkin, C., Newell, B. R, Pasqualino, M., & Newell, B. (2015). A Bayesian latent mixture model analysis shows that informative samples reduce base rate neglect. Decision, 24, 306-318.

For all publications, please view my profile on the UNSW Research Gateway.

Awards, Fellowships & Grants

Current Research Grants:

  • The dog that didn’t bark: A Bayesian account of reasoning from censored data

    Brett Hayes, Danielle Navarro, Charles Kemp

    Australian Research Council Discovery Grant

    2019-2021

     

    Towards an integrated model of reasoning and reasoning development

    Brett Hayes, John Dunn, Michael Lee

    Australian Research Council Discovery Grant

    2019-2021

     

    The role of inductive reasoning in generalization of associative learning

    Peter Lovibond & Brett Hayes

    Australian Research Council Discovery Grant

    2016-2018

     

    Uncovering the cognitive processes underlying human reasoning: A state-trace approach

    Brett Hayes, John Dunn

    Australian Research Council Discovery Grant

    2015-2018

Current Research Students

Belinda Xie; Jeremy Ngo