Ruth Elijah

Ruth Elijah

Ruth Elijah

Doctoral/MPsych (Clinical) Candidate

B. Psychol (Honours Class 1), 2012, UNSW

Contact details

Email: Ruth Elijah

Office: Mathews Building, Room 1402

Research Summary

Supervisor: A/Prof Thomas Whitford

Co-supervisor: A/Prof Mike Le Pelley 

Research Area: Temporal predictability of self-initiated sensations and modifying electrophysiological responses to self-initated sensations with training; the psychological and neurophysiological processes underlying psychotic experiences; schizophrenia and psychosis. 

Teaching

PSYC3301: Psychology and Law

- Course Tutor, Semester 1, 2013, 2015 - 2016

PSYC1001: Psychology 1A

- Course Tutor, Semester 1, 2015, 2017

PSYC1001: Psychology 1B

- Course Tutor, Semester 2, 2015 - 2016

PSYC1111: Measuring Mind and Behaviour

- Course Tutor, Semester 2, 2016

Publications

Publications:

Elijah, R.B., Le Pelley, M.E., & Whitford, T.J. (2016). Modifying temporal expectations: Changing cortical responsivity to delayed self-initiated sensations with training. Biological Psychology, 120, 88-95. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2016.09.001

Selected Conference Presentations:

Elijah R., Le Pelley, M., & Whitford, T. (2017).Modifying temporal expectations of self-generated sensations with training. Oral Presentation. Science of the Self: The Agency and Body Representation Research Forum, Sydney, Australia.

Elijah R., Le Pelley, M., & Whitford, T. (2017). Using training to change expectations regarding the timing of self-generated sensations: Implications for schizophrenia. Oral Presentation. Australian Association for Cognitive and Behaviour Therapy, Sydney, Australia.

Elijah, R.B. Griffiths, O., Pearson, D., Jack, B., Mifsud, N.G., Libesman, S., Han, N., De Wet, R., Le Pelley, M.E., Harris, A., Whitford, T.J. (2017). Electrophysiological investigation of temporal predictions of self-generated sensations in patients with schizophrenia. Oral Presentation. UNSW Forensic and Clinical Psychology Conference, Sydney, Australia.

Elijah, R.B., Le Pelley, M.E., & Whitford, T.J. (2017). Modifying the neural expectation that sensations follow immediately from a self-initiated action. Poster Presentation. International Conference for Cognitive Neuroscience, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Elijah, R.B., Le Pelley, M.E., & Whitford, T.J. (2016). Modifying N1 amplitude: Training an expectation that delayed auditory sensations result from a self-initiated action. Oral Presentation. Australasian Society for Psychophysiology Conference, Adelaide, Australia.

Elijah, R. B., Le Pelley, M.E., & Whitford, T.J. (2016). Using training to modify the neural expectation that sensations follow immediately from actions. Poster Presentation. Australasian Cognitive Neuroscience Society Conference, Shoal Bay, Australia.

Elijah, R. B., Le Pelley, M.E., & Whitford, T.J. (2016). Attenuation of Auditory Cortical Responses to Delayed Self-Generated Tones with Training: Implications for Alleviating Source Monitoring Deficits in Schizophrenia. Oral Presentation. 8th World Congress for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Melbourne, Australia.  

Elijah, R. B., Whitford, T. J. & Le Pelley, M.E. (2015). Modifying N1 amplitude to self-initiated tones with training: Implications for psychosis. Oral Presentation. Biological Psychiatry Australia Conference, Sydney, Australia.

Elijah, R. & Whitford, T. (2015). Modifying N1-suppression to self-generated tones with training: Implications for alleviating source monitoring deficits in schizophrenia. Oral Presentation. Social and Emotional Neuroscience Extravaganza, Sydney, Australia. 

Elijah, R.B. & Whitford, T.J. (2014). Modifying N1-suppression to self-generated tones with training: implications for alleviating source monitoring deficits in schizophrenia. Poster Presentation. Society for Mental Health Research, Adelaide, Australia. 

 

Awards, Fellowships & Grants

2014 - 2017: Australian Postgraduate Award

2017: UNSW ARC Postgraduate Research Student Award

2016: Best Postgraduate Oral Presentation at the Australasian Society for Psychophysiology Conference.

2016: Travel award for the Australasian Society for Psychophysiology Conference.

2016: Best PhD Candidate Poster Award at the Australasian Cognitive Neuroscience Society Conference

2015: Award for the Highest Ranked Abstract at the Biological Psychiatry Australia Conference

2012: Dementia and Collaborative Research Centre Honours Scholarship  

2010: Faculty of Science Dean's List

2009: The Staff Prize for First Year Psychology 

Affiliations & Memberships

Psychologist, Psychology Board of Australia

Member Australasian Cognitive Neuroscience Society

Member Australian Society for Psychophysiology

Member Australian Clinical Psychology Association